The Healthcare Standard

Wearable Technology Named Top Health and Fitness Trend For 2020

More Americans are using wearable fitness trackers than ever to monitor their health, a trend the American College of Sports Medicine says is the top fitness trend for 2020, according to a recent survey.

ACSM’s “Worldwide Survey of Fitness Trends for 2020” interviewed over 3,000 health and fitness professionals, all of which said that wearable technology will be the top trend in fitness next year, with millions of Americans already using such technology to monitor their exercises, heart rate, calorie consumption, sleep quality and step count.

“Wearable tech has become ingrained in today’s culture, and the industry shows no signs of slowing down,” said Walter R. Thompson, Ph.D., ACSM Past President and lead author of the survey and associate dean in the College of Education and Human Development at Georgia State University in Atlanta. “Tech advances have made it easier than ever for users to collect important health metrics and work with fitness professionals and health care providers to improve exercise efficiency, develop healthy lifestyles, manage chronic diseases and, ultimately, increase quality of life.”

 

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The Healthcare Standard

Safety in Numbers: Moose Lake Hospital Joins Essentia Health

DULUTH — Essentia Health is partnering with Moose Lake’s Mercy Hospital in a move that would expand the Duluth-based provider’s regional footprint and shore up the rural hospital’s finances.

“It’s a scary time for small hospitals,” said Dr. Jon Pryor, Essentia’s president of operations in northeast Minnesota and northwest Wisconsin. “There’s safety in numbers.”

Mercy’s board voted to join forces with Essentia on Monday after requesting partner proposals earlier this fall. While details of the arrangement won’t be finalized until next year, Pryor said Mercy would be “totally integrated” with Essentia, and the partnership would do away with the $500,000 regional tax levy supporting the 56-year-old hospital.

 

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The Healthcare Standard

More Vaccinations Could Be Provided in Community Pharmacies, Says Advisory Group

An interim report from NHS England and NHS Improvement into immunisation and vaccination provision has proposed building on community pharmacy’s contribution to vaccination services.

Community pharmacy vaccination services are seen as accessible and convenient for patients

An advisory group reviewing immunisation and vaccination provision in the NHS has said it will look at increasing the number of vaccinations being delivered in community pharmacy.

The group, which is carrying out a ‘Vaccinations and Immunisations Review’, and which includes representatives from NHS England and the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee, said this may “build upon” community pharmacy’s flu vaccine service.

 

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The Healthcare Standard

10 tips to keep your child safe and sound at Halloween

When you are buying children’s costumes and costume accessories, such as wigs, look for the CE mark. This shows that it has been made with safety in mind and according to safety legislation. Be aware of fire risks and try to find costumes that are flame resistant. If you are buying props for your child’s costume, keep in mind that younger children – under the age of three – can choke on small parts and some props may be unsuitable for them.

Costumes should fit your child properly to prevent trips and falls. Avoid items such as oversized shoes, high heels, long dresses and long capes. Make sure all costumes, accessories and props are suitable for your child’s age and developmental stage. Masks can make it difficult for your child to see and can reduce their hearing and obstruct their breathing too. Instead, try using non-toxic face make-up, but make sure it adheres to a safety standard and check that your child is not allergic to it.

 

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The Healthcare Standard

California health insurance must also include housing, counseling

Life packed a lot of hardship into Ma’Lissa Simon’s 24 years. Bullied by schoolmates and siblings about her weight, anger drove her into gangs, drugs and even prostitution before the age of 18. She spent some time in prison. Once she got out, transitional programs did not work and she ended up on the streets. It was not until she was six months pregnant with twins, in the hospital for gestational diabetes and kidney problems, that things started to change.

She learned about Housing for Health, an L.A. County program designed to improve health outcomes by helping individuals experiencing homelessness to move into permanent housing.

In 2017, L.A. Care Health Plan committed $20 million over five years to Brilliant Corners, the agency that finds locations for the Housing for Health program.

The goal was to house 300 individuals experiencing homelessness – 291 individuals have been placed in housing so far. Ma’Lissa was the first.

 

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The Healthcare Standard

Delta hospital suit alleges owed wages

Delta County Memorial Hospital District caused nursing and other hospital staffers work through break periods for which they had to clock out, and engaged in a longstanding practice of not properly compensating hourly employees for off-the-clock work, a federal lawsuit alleges.

Krystal Gray, who worked as a nurse at DCMH, filed the complaint Oct. 15 as a class and collective action on her own behalf and on behalf of others similarly affected, the latter of whom could opt-in to the action. Potentially dozens of people were affected by the hospital’s alleged policies, the complaint says.

 

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The Healthcare Standard

Researchers Paying People To Be Infected With Flu Virus

(CNN) – It’s widely accepted that the flu and the torrent of uncomfortable symptoms that come with it are to be avoided at all costs.

But a few selfless souls have signed up to get the infection so that one day, perhaps none of us will have to endure it ever again — and they get paid, too.

Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases are infecting willing subjects with influenza A (the infamous H1N1 virus, which has caused pandemics) and closely monitoring their symptoms to better understand how the virus works and how to control it.

For a handsome sum of up to $3,300, 80 adult participants across four research facilities will receive a nasal spray with the virus and spend at least one week at an inpatient facility until they’ve stopped “shedding” the virus — that is, potentially infecting other people.

 

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The Healthcare Standard

CMS On How Life Sciences Advancements Are Improving Patient Care

When the UK Life Sciences Champion Sir John Bell recently highlighted the need to create new industries within life sciences, Carina Healy immediately saw the potential for Scotland.

Sir John, speaking at the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency, identified genomics, digital health and early diagnosis as three areas where the UK could develop new industries and remain a world leader in life sciences.

Healy, a partner and life sciences specialist with international legal firm CMS, says: “These areas play into what we do well in Scotland and present very big opportunities.” Healy goes on to explain these new industries and the potential they hold for Scotland.

Genomics – using genotyping to inform how patients are treated – is closely linked to precision or stratified medicine, where Scotland is already excelling.

 

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The Healthcare Standard

100,000 more people to be given personal health budgets

A change in law means people who use wheelchairs or need mental health support will have greater choice and control in managing their own health and care.

The change in law comes into force on Monday 2 December, following legislation being laid in Parliament today (31 October).

From 2 December, everyone eligible for an NHS wheelchair and people who require aftercare services under section 117 of the Mental Health Act will have access to a personal health budget.

 

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The Healthcare Standard

Doctor Staffing Company Faces Suit Over Bonus Payments

A class of emergency room physicians may proceed with a claim that their employer breached their contracts by failing to pay them required bonuses for supervising other health-care professionals, the Middle District of Alabama said.

The court refused to dismiss claims that the employment contracts obligated Team Health Inc. to pay doctors more money for supervising advanced practice clinicians based on a value assigned to that activity. The bonus system enabled the employer to increase its billings and collections, the physicians said.

 

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