Nursing Home Care

Many nursing home staff decline vaccine: frustrated families wait for news on visiting restrictions

ARVADA, Colo. — It’s now been one year since Marie Nadeau has hugged, kissed or even held the hand of her 87-year-old mom.

“It’s extremely difficult,” Nadeau said. “I want to hold her, and she needs that, too.”

Although Nadeau’s mom, Fae, has now received both doses of the vaccine, residential care visits in Colorado are still limited, in Marie’s case, to visits through a window.

“We sit out in the cold when we do the window visits,” she said. “I don’t know why I can’t at least give her a hug.”

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment says part of the problem is that while the vast majority of elderly residents are getting vaccinated, only about 50% of residential care staff are choosing to get the shot, even though they’re all eligible.

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Woman Suffering from Mental Health Issue

Has the pandemic really caused a ‘tsunami’ of mental health problems?

How is the population of the UK coping with the continuing coronavirus crisis? According to some media reports and commentators in the mental health community, we are now facing “the greatest threat to mental health since the second world war” and a potential “tsunami” of psychological problems.

With a team of experts from the Universities of Sheffield, Ulster, Liverpool, UCL and Royal Holloway and Bedford College I have been monitoring the mental health of the UK population since the beginning of the crisis. Looking at our findings, we think that this tsunami narrative is misleading. If accepted uncritically, it could undermine efforts to protect the health of the population and also our ability as a nation to recover once the crisis is over. Here is why.

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Health & Wellness

12 lifestyle habits to reduce stress

People have been living in a storm of stress during the ongoing pandemic and political turmoil, which has had a negative impact on our well-being.

A little bit of stress is good, and essential for survival, but severe or prolonged stress can increase the risk for stress-related diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s disease, cancer and others.

Chronic stress is thought to contribute to excess inflammation throughout the body that plays a critical role in the onset and progression of stress-related disease, along with elevated levels of the hormone cortisol.

“Some concerns with consistently high levels of cortisol include elevated blood glucose levels, weight gain, increased appetite, GI issues, hypertension, and suppression of the immune system,” explained Felicia Porrazza, a Philadelphia-based registered dietitian who helps stressed-out clients find natural ways to improve their overall wellness.
Elder Man Using Tech

Home Health Tech You Need To Watch in 2021

Some of the most interesting health tech trends at the outset of 2021 point to a future that merges healthcare with consumer electronics, two trends that have barely touched so far. At CES 2021, CNET’s Senior VP of Content & Strategy Lindsey Turrentine asked if they can provide better healthcare than in the doctor’s office when merged. Here are some of the most interesting health tech products that may bring us to that point.

Continuous monitoring

Health tech that knows you’re having an issue is just a tree falling in the forest unless there’s a connection to the healthcare system. Omron has taken an important step in that direction with its VitalSight connected blood-pressure monitoring system. It’s not a slick watch, nor does it take your readings passively, but when you do take a reading it automatically logs it into your electronic medical record and can notify your care provider if you need attention. Vitalsight is being made available through physicians.

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Folding Laundry

Laundry is Tedious. But It Could Improve Your Mental Health?

How to make each moment count — this has been the overarching focus of my columns so far this year.

Maybe it’s because of COVID-19, but it has been abundantly clear to me lately that life is short, and nothing is guaranteed. So, I want to live with that in mind.

I want to be as present as I can.

But as I’ve been saying in recent weeks, presence can be elusive. We’re programmed to be constantly in our heads: revisiting the past, anticipating the future, narrating, analyzing, dwelling — you name it.

Just knowing that we have this uncanny ability to mentally talk ourselves out of fully participating in our lives is helpful. It’s the starting point for being less caught up in our thoughts.

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Construction

How Contractors Are Managing Health And Safety Regulations

Contractors are moving forward with ongoing projects—in many cases—but have had the challenge of adapting to new health and safety protocols during the pandemic. This includes social distancing, using new technologies and creating new site plans. Water feature design and construction company OTL, which is known for installing interactive water fountains in commercial properties, says that these new adjustments were among the challenges of operating during the pandemic.

“As the health and safety of our team members and the public is always our top priority, we are experienced in keeping the public out of construction areas for projects like Graham Garden, where we were required to keep active construction areas clear while maintaining passage through the courtyard to the office buildings and on-site restaurants,” J. Wickham Zimmerman, CEO of OTL, tells GlobeSt.com. “With the new challenge of COVID-19, we developed ways to work effectively while maintaining social distancing between our crewmembers. Since this is not always possible, engineering controls are required in some cases.”

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Mental Health Awareness Ribbon

Recognizing World Mental Health Day

In recognition of the stress that Carolina students are experiencing in this unprecedented semester and in observance of World Mental Health Day, UNC-Chapel Hill leaders are recommending that faculty pause instruction on Oct. 9 to allow for a three-day weekend.

World Mental Health Day is Saturday, Oct. 10, and given the stress we have heard that many of our students are under, we recommend faculty recognize Friday, Oct. 9 (which is also midpoint of the fall term), as the University’s observance of World Mental Health Day by “pausing” instruction on that day, creating a three-day weekend and allowing time for self-care. While the compressed academic calendar does not allow us to provide a day off, this pause might include, but is not limited to: changing a live lecture to a recorded one to be watched at a later date, postponing the due date of a paper or rescheduling a quiz. We believe that faculty flexibility and compassion on this day, and throughout the semester, will support and facilitate better student mental health.

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Woman Pharmaceutical Worker

Top Ten Pharma Companies in 2020

The global pharmaceutical industry is expected to witness positive growth as the top pharma companies are at forefront of the fight against COVID-19.

The global pharmaceutical industry is expected to witness positive growth as the top pharma companies are at forefront of the fight against COVID-19.

From Johnson & Johnson to Shanghai Pharmaceuticals, Pharmaceutical Technology lists the top ten pharmaceutical companies in 2020, based on revenues.

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Coronavirus

Leaders Who Caught Virus: Boris Johnson, Jair Bolsonaro and Now Trump

Mr. Johnson, Britain’s prime minister, was hospitalized. Mr. Bolsonaro, Brazil’s president, appeared to have a mild case. Other top officials worldwide have also been infected.

As the coronavirus has spread around the globe, world leaders have not been spared.

With his positive coronavirus test, President Trump joins the ranks of others like Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain and President Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil who have been infected. Also having tested positive are the presidents of Bolivia, Guatemala and Honduras and the prime ministers of Armenia and Russia.

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Essential Business

The Business of Health: Keeping The Lights on Through The Pandemic and Beyond

For some hospitals and health systems, especially those in rural areas, keeping the lights on by having stable financial performance has long been a challenge. And now COVID-19 is causing even strong positive margins to slip into the red.

The government, through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, has eased some of the burden by allowing providers flexibility in the use of telehealth during the public health emergency. Some of these temporary measures may become permanent, though the big question of whether payment parity will remain has yet to be answered.

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